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(Source: welucathings)

speedqueen46:

Take this advice

speedqueen46:

Take this advice

(Source: genuruch)

fyeahhhthebizarre:

Rosalia Lombardo was an Italian child born in 1918 in Palermo, Sicily. She died of pneumonia on December 6, 1920. Rosalia’s father, General Lombardo, was sorely grieved upon her death, so he approached Alfredo Salafia, a noted embalmer, to preserve her. Her body was one of the last corpses to be admitted to the Capuchin catacombs of Palermo in Sicily.
Thanks to Salafia’s embalming techniques, the body was well preserved. X-rays of the body show that all the organs are remarkably intact. Rosalia Lombardo’s body is kept in a small chapel at the end of the catacomb’s tour and is encased in a glass covered coffin, placed on a marble pedestal. A 2009 National Geographic photograph of Rosalia Lombardo shows the mummy is beginning to show signs of decomposition, most notably discoloration. To address these issues the mummy was moved to a new drier spot in the catacombs, and her original coffin was placed in a hermetically sealed glass enclosure with nitrogen gas to prevent decay. The mummy is one of the best preserved bodies in the catacombs.
Recently, the mummification techniques used by Salafia were discovered in a handwritten memoir of Salafia’s. Salafia replaced the girl’s blood with a liquid made of formalin to kill bacteria, alcohol to dry the body, glycerin to keep her from overdrying, salicylic acid to kill fungi, and zinc salts to give her body rigidity. Accordingly, the formula’s composition is “one part glycerin, one part formalin saturated with both zinc sulfate and chloride, and one part of an alcohol solution saturated with salicylic acid.

fyeahhhthebizarre:

Rosalia Lombardo was an Italian child born in 1918 in Palermo, Sicily. She died of pneumonia on December 6, 1920. Rosalia’s father, General Lombardo, was sorely grieved upon her death, so he approached Alfredo Salafia, a noted embalmer, to preserve her. Her body was one of the last corpses to be admitted to the Capuchin catacombs of Palermo in Sicily.

Thanks to Salafia’s embalming techniques, the body was well preserved. X-rays of the body show that all the organs are remarkably intact. Rosalia Lombardo’s body is kept in a small chapel at the end of the catacomb’s tour and is encased in a glass covered coffin, placed on a marble pedestal. A 2009 National Geographic photograph of Rosalia Lombardo shows the mummy is beginning to show signs of decomposition, most notably discoloration. To address these issues the mummy was moved to a new drier spot in the catacombs, and her original coffin was placed in a hermetically sealed glass enclosure with nitrogen gas to prevent decay. The mummy is one of the best preserved bodies in the catacombs.

Recently, the mummification techniques used by Salafia were discovered in a handwritten memoir of Salafia’s. Salafia replaced the girl’s blood with a liquid made of formalin to kill bacteria, alcohol to dry the body, glycerin to keep her from overdrying, salicylic acid to kill fungi, and zinc salts to give her body rigidity. Accordingly, the formula’s composition is “one part glycerin, one part formalin saturated with both zinc sulfate and chloride, and one part of an alcohol solution saturated with salicylic acid.

dichotomization:

Rosalia Lombardo died of pneumonia in Palermo, Siciliy on December 6, 1920, at the tender age of 2. Her heartbroken father, a well-to-do general, enlisted the services of Alfredo Salafia, the country’s best embalmer. General Lombardo also secured Rosalia the honor of one of the last spots in the Capuchin Catacombs. To this day, Rosalia resides in a small chapel, within a glass covered coffin, and is considered the best-preserved child corpse in the world. Salafia’s embalming techniques and recipes are studied the world over, but it seems he might have done his job too well. Numerous visitors, lingering overlong in her burial chamber, have sworn that every once in a while little Rosalia opens her eyes.

dichotomization:

Rosalia Lombardo died of pneumonia in Palermo, Siciliy on December 6, 1920, at the tender age of 2. Her heartbroken father, a well-to-do general, enlisted the services of Alfredo Salafia, the country’s best embalmer. General Lombardo also secured Rosalia the honor of one of the last spots in the Capuchin Catacombs. To this day, Rosalia resides in a small chapel, within a glass covered coffin, and is considered the best-preserved child corpse in the world. Salafia’s embalming techniques and recipes are studied the world over, but it seems he might have done his job too well. Numerous visitors, lingering overlong in her burial chamber, have sworn that every once in a while little Rosalia opens her eyes.

schneiderei:

I would explain what I’m doing, but every attempt so far has failed; my advice, just go with it! Merz Writing: The Eichmann Box
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schneiderei:

I would explain what I’m doing, but every attempt so far has failed; my advice, just go with it! Merz Writing: The Eichmann Box

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shared via WordPress.com

Rosalia Lombardo

anongproblemamo:

Rosalia Lombardo died of pneumonia at the age of two in Palermo, Sicily on December 6th, 1920. She is the best preserved child in the world and she was embalmed by the country’s best embalmer, Alfredo Salafia.

Urban legend has it that Rosalia opens her eyes every now and then. Most of the time, it was brushed off as just a rumor, until someone set up a camera and discovered this.


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